AR-13

ar-13 sculpture

AR-13 refers to the combination of the thirteen six year old girls killed in Newtown and the AR-15 which was used in the Aurora, Colorado shooting 12-dead 58 wounded by gunfire and 12 wounded by tear gas or trampling and what happened when you do nothing - six months later, the Newtown, CT shooting happened also with an AR-15. The gunman, his mother, 6 teachers, and 20 six year olds all dead, including 13 six year old girls. This sculpture incorporates 20 paper dolls with an 8.5 foot by 11 foot painting called "A Stitch in Time" after the old adage 'A stitch in time saves nine'.


ar-13 sculpture

AR-13 was on display at 27th Street and 2nd Avenue in Winwood for the entire Art Basel week, 2014. This view shows the 20 Newtown dolls to the left of "A Stitch in Time" and the 72 Aurora dolls to the right of "A Stitch in Time." The sculpture hydraulically assembles and is hydraulically adjustable depending on what series of dolls are extending from the end of the gun.


ar-13 sculpture

This view of AR-13 shows the two 50 round drums that feed 100 rounds into the AR-15 (100 round magazine) used in Aurora. The movie reel on the left encapsulates one hundred actual spent shells, and the drum on the right has a wolf in sheep's clothing inspired by the NRA's insistence that the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. I consider this statement to be a dangerous hollow point. The bronze globe in the foreground has a hole at the top and is suspended by a thin cable, a metaphor of a hollow point bullet and the world hanging by a thread. Hollow point bullets mushroom out and crumble in the body, doing much more damage than a standard bullet. This sculpture had a working title "A Hollow Point Does More Damage- Seas No Tears." This globe was sold to collector Kerry Gruson (a Harvard grad who worked at the New York Times for 27 years) during Art Basel and restored to its original global warming concept.


ar-13 sculpture

This is the other side at the rear of the sculpture. These letters "N-R-A" were given to me as the last three letters from the Bryn Mawr theater marquee. I put them in the backyard and over the years they slowly sank into the mud. When the Aurora shooting happened almost three years ago, I envisioned them on a curved armature but did nothing. Six months later, when Newtown happened, I immediately got them out of the mud, welded them to a curved armature on wheels, which I could tow behind my wheelchair and have been dedicating a large amount of my work to gun violence. Here you see the wheelchair trailer/armature mounted on the large AR-13 installation. The letters retain their original patina and glass insulators from their earlier neon days.


ar-13 sculpture

Here you see the thirteen dolls in pink lace with seven ghost white lace classmates. AR-13.